The Jungle

By Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, University of Oxford As we write about the Self, the image of the refugee always floats nearby. It floats palpably and metonymically, as both its own entity and marker. At this moment in time, the refugee has become the conceit of bare survival, the naked survivor whose corpus is no longer … Continue reading The Jungle

Hannah Arendt: On Displacement and Political Judgement

In this new piece, Refugee Hosts’ Co-Investigator Dr. Anna Rowlands reflects on the ways in which Hannah Arendt can help us better understand local community responses to displacement. In the context of our Refugee Hosts project, such a reflection leads us to ask: How can we collectively work towards promoting modes of governance, responsibility and … Continue reading Hannah Arendt: On Displacement and Political Judgement

Loss and Everyday Life on the Syrian-Turkish Border

By Charlotte Loris-Rodionoff, University College London In the aftermath of the 2011 Syrian revolution and in the midst of an ongoing war, what does loss mean for Syrians living in Southern Turkey ? How is this loss experienced, and how does it affect Syrians’ everyday lives in Turkey? Those are some of the questions I examined … Continue reading Loss and Everyday Life on the Syrian-Turkish Border

Syrians in Akkar: Refugees or Neighbours?

Rethinking Hospitality towards Syrian Refugees in Lebanon by Estella Carpi, University College London-Development Planning Unit & Save the Children-Humanitarian Affairs Team The discourse of ‘hospitality’ has both informed and reinforced the international response to the mass influx of Syrian refugees into Lebanon since the outbreak of the Syrian conflict. However, while unprecedented in scale – by the end … Continue reading Syrians in Akkar: Refugees or Neighbours?

Externalising the ‘Refugee Crisis’: A Consequence of Historical Denial?

Externalising the ‘Refugee Crisis’: A Consequence of Historical Denial? By Aydan Greatrick, University College London The Global North has struggled to respond to the ‘Refugee Crisis’ in coherent and meaningful ways, in part because of policy short-termism that fails to take history seriously. If we are to find better ways of responding to displacement, we … Continue reading Externalising the ‘Refugee Crisis’: A Consequence of Historical Denial?