With a third eye, I see the catastrophe

With a third eye, I see the catastrophe By Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, University of Oxford and Refugee Hosts  [I write the secret]. On the doorstep, finding her way to the seeds that escaped her lap: Like the one who read the book, Son, read my swollen legs, another’s land. The camp happens in the distance. … Continue reading With a third eye, I see the catastrophe

‘Refugees ask Refugees: The Poetics of Displacement’ – Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge’s guest talk at Bard College, Berlin

On the 16th of March 2020, Refugee Hosts' Co-I Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge will offer a guest talk at Bard College, Berlin, titled 'Refugees ask Refugees: The Poetics of Displacement'. The talk will draw on the Refugee Hosts project, including the writing of Refugee Hosts' writer-in-residence, Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, whose poetic lines in 'Writing the Camp. Vis-à-vis … Continue reading ‘Refugees ask Refugees: The Poetics of Displacement’ – Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge’s guest talk at Bard College, Berlin

New Book: Refugee Imaginaries: Research Across Humanities

Refugee Imaginaries: Research Across the Humanities ‘explores how refugees imagine the world and how the world imagines them.’ Through a collection of over 30 chapters, co-edited by Refugee Hosts Co-Investigator Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge, and written by experts from a range of disciplines, the book places ‘refugee imaginaries at the centre of interdisciplinary exchange’ and ‘demonstrates … Continue reading New Book: Refugee Imaginaries: Research Across Humanities

Yousif M. Qasmiyeh’s poetry in Odyssey: Words and Music of Finding Home

We are very pleased to announce that two new poems, 'A Soliloquy before Time' and 'Time,' by Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, Refugee Hosts' writer-in-residence, will feature in Odyssey: Words and Music of Finding Home, a narrative recital by the award-winning actor Christopher Kent and pianist Gamal Khamis. You can watch the live stream of the recital performed on Friday … Continue reading Yousif M. Qasmiyeh’s poetry in Odyssey: Words and Music of Finding Home

Listen: Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, on the Staying Alive: Poetry and Crisis podcast – Death Leaves Signs

Listen to Refugee Hosts' writer-in-residence, Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, in conversation with Adriana X. Jacobs (University of Oxford) who is the producer and host of the Staying Alive: Poetry and Crisis podcast series, as he discusses writing the camp, poetry’s ways of seeing, and the signs that death leaves in the camp to remember, revisit, and translate.

Yousif M. Qasmiyeh at the World Conference on Statelessness

On the 28th and 29th of June 2019, Refugee Hosts' Writer in Residence, Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, will be contributing to the World Conference on Statelessness in The Hague. In addition to speaking and reading his poetry at the panel on 'Citizenship in Unrecognised States' on 28th of June, Yousif will be participating in a series … Continue reading Yousif M. Qasmiyeh at the World Conference on Statelessness

Translation workshop on contemporary Arabic poetry produced by Palestinian, Iraqi and Syrian refugees.

On Monday, 4th February, Refugee Hosts' writer-in-residence, Yousif M. Qasmiyeh, will facilitate a translation workshop focusing on contemporary Arabic poetry produced by Palestinian, Iraqi and Syrian refugees as part of the Refugee Hosts' creative writing workshops convened by Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge and Yousif in Lebanon (Baddawi Camp and Hamra) and Jordan (Jerash and Al-Zarqa) in 2018. Held as part of the Oxford Comparative Criticism Translation (OCCT) Discussion Group … Continue reading Translation workshop on contemporary Arabic poetry produced by Palestinian, Iraqi and Syrian refugees.

“To embroider the voice with its own needle”

Marking the launch of the inaugural issue of the Migration and Society journal, in this piece Yousif M. Qasmiyeh (Refugee Hosts' Writer in Residence and Creative Encounters Editor of the new journal) sets out one of the aims of the journals' Creative Encounters section; to problematise the notion of voice. The piece also presents five poems … Continue reading “To embroider the voice with its own needle”