‘Behind each work there is a story of pain’: Nedhal’s art makes her happy

Nedhal uses art not just as a method of recovery from trauma and pain, but as a means of showing solidarity and welcome to new arrivals, a way of connecting with people who have experience of displacement and loss, and to bridge the gap between people from different cultures, countries and generations. These are all … Continue reading ‘Behind each work there is a story of pain’: Nedhal’s art makes her happy

‘How Did it Feel to Ask those Questions?’ – An Email Exchange about Experiencing Research on Displacement.

In this post Hanna Schneider and her colleague Israa Sadder share an email exchange in which they discuss conducting research with Syrian refugees living in Jordan. The exchange describes the relationships developed both between researchers and intermediaries, and between researchers, intermediaries and their interlocutors. These research relationships raise multiple questions regarding how working as an … Continue reading ‘How Did it Feel to Ask those Questions?’ – An Email Exchange about Experiencing Research on Displacement.

‘And then they issued an ultimatum’: Ethical and practical considerations for conducting fieldwork in volatile and research-crowded settings

‘The last thing they needed – I assumed – was one more researcher who wanted to ask them questions for an hour of their precious time.’ Following the ultimatum issued by Turkish authorities to unregistered Syrian refugees in Istanbul to leave the city within one month, Hanna Schneider reflects on the ethical and practical considerations … Continue reading ‘And then they issued an ultimatum’: Ethical and practical considerations for conducting fieldwork in volatile and research-crowded settings

Objective Enough to Tell the Truth

Objective Enough to Tell the Truth This presentation was given by Dima Hamadmad at the Refugee Hosts International Conference, Without Exception: The Politics and Poetics of Local Responses to Displacement, Dima's presentation examines the importance of language within academic research and the ethics of using dominant narratives, often perceived as objective, but that can decontextualize and ignore … Continue reading Objective Enough to Tell the Truth

Objective enough to tell the truth

This presentation was given by Dima Al-Hamadmad at the Refugee Hosts International Conference and examined the many narratives regarding the Syrian conflict and subsequent displacement of refugees from Syria, and the impact of this narrative on refugee rights and an increasingly hostile environment.  Objective enough to tell the truth by Dima Al-Hamadmad, Researcher, Refugee Hosts Objectivity means telling … Continue reading Objective enough to tell the truth

“Who pays you?” Guilt and reservations in producing policy relevant research on refugees

‘Have I been “staring too hard” at my participants’ displacement, neglecting other aspects of their lives?’ In this blog post Wen-Yu Wu reflects on some of the ethical dilemmas and feelings of guilt experienced during her research with displaced Syrian students in Lebanon and Jordan. As a recipient of a ‘Global Challenges’ Scholarship from the … Continue reading “Who pays you?” Guilt and reservations in producing policy relevant research on refugees

Research impact and Policy Influence: On Bricks and Visions

In this blog Professor Alastair Ager, Refugee Hosts Co-Investigator, contributes to our Reflections from the Field series by drawing on his experience of working on the project and his role as a government advisor to highlight the importance of the interface between research and policy.  Ager uses the analogy of ‘bricks and visions’ to discuss … Continue reading Research impact and Policy Influence: On Bricks and Visions

The value of everyday resilience

In this post, Caroline Lenette draws on her experience of co-producing research with refugee women with diverse backgrounds and lives. Lenette argues that resilience is not an extraordinary phenomenon embodied only by those refugees in the public eye, but something that is played out in the everyday, often mundane, and sometimes violent, lives that refugee … Continue reading The value of everyday resilience

The importance of identity – reflections from fieldwork in Hamra, Beirut

‘There can be no question that the background of the researcher affects what and whom s/he can access for research purposes’  argues local Refugee Hosts researcher, Bayan Itani as she reflects on her experiences of completing fieldwork in the local neighbourhood of Hamra, in the capital city of Lebanon, Beirut. Itani reflects on how her own … Continue reading The importance of identity – reflections from fieldwork in Hamra, Beirut

The Third Voice and Third Eye in our Photo-Poetic Reflections

The Third Voice and Third Eye in our Photo-Poetic Reflections by Yousif M. Qasmiyeh (University of Oxford) and Prof. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (Refugee Hosts) A shared surname both reflects and itself has produced diverse forms of creative intimacies in a range of research and non-research encounters. In a series of photo-poetic reflections published as part of … Continue reading The Third Voice and Third Eye in our Photo-Poetic Reflections